Need Aid For Your Shuttered Venue? End Of May Is The Earliest You Might Get It : NPR

Live event spaces like the Sound Nightclub in Los Angeles have been waiting for emergency assistance for months. Mario Tama / Getty Images Hide caption

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Mario Tama / Getty Images

Live event spaces like the Sound Nightclub in Los Angeles have been waiting for emergency assistance for months.

Mario Tama / Getty Images

Owners of live music venues, theaters, museums, and other businesses covered by the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant (SVOG) can expect cash by the end of May. This emerges from an update by the Small Business Administration, which handled the bumpy rollout of the SVOG program.

An SBA spokesman said in an email that since the portal opened to apply for these grants a week ago, 10,300 applications have been submitted (another 12,000 have started but not completed). The vast majority of these requests came from “operators or promoters of live venues”, followed by performing arts organizations, and then cinemas.

The SBA has examined applications and stated in a statement that “Applicants will receive an award notice this month” which will be paid out by the end of May if the applicant responds “in good time to the award notice”.

In December, closed venues are still waiting for state aid

The SVOG program is a $ 16 billion emergency aid program that then-President Donald Trump put into law in late December 2020 through the coronavirus battles. But for an emergency relief program, it took months to get money into the hands of business owners holding back landlords, insurance companies, and other creditors. These owners waited for an official announcement in early 2021 as to when they would be able to apply for the scholarship while they gathered all the papers and papers they thought necessary. Once the application site was up, it crashed and closed.

Even as big celebrations Roll-out in the US and bands announce tours for later in the year. Many small live event spaces are still threatened with closing. The National Independent Venue Association, one of the noisiest groups advocating support for live music venues, has long said that 90% of its members would be forced to shut down unaided – which would harm nearby bars, restaurants and shops, not to mention the grand apparatus that makes up the live touring arts industry.



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