• February 4, 2023

Tevin Coleman News

Signed a $ 2 million one-year deal with the Jets in March 2021.

View the red zone opportunities within the 20, 10, and 5 yard lines and the percentage of time they turned the opportunity into a touchdown.

Loading Fantasy / Red Zone Stats … How do Tevin Coleman’s 2020 expanded stats compare to other running backs?

This section compares its advanced stats to players in the same position. The bar represents the player’s percentile rank. For example, if the bar is halfway, the player will fall into the 50th percentile for that metric and this is considered average. The longer the bar, the better it is for the player.

Explain these statistics

  • Broken Tackle%

    The number of broken duels divided by rush attempts.

  • Positive run%

    The percentage of running games where he was able to achieve positive mileage.

  • % Yds after contact

    The percentage of his express gardens that came after contact.

  • Average After contact

    He wins the average rushing yards after contact.

  • Rushing TD%

    Rushing touchdowns divided by rush attempts. In other words, how many times does he score while running the ball?

  • Touched per game

    The number of touches (rush attempts + receptions) is on average per game

  • % Snaps to the touch

    The number of touches (rush attempts + receptions) divided by the offensive snapshots played.

  • Air yards per game

    The number of air yards that he determines on average per game. Air yards measure how far down the ball has been thrown for complete and incomplete passes. Air yards are recorded as a negative value when sighting the pass beyond the scrimmage line. All aerodrome data comes from Sports Info Solutions and does not include any ejections as targeted passports.

  • Air yards per snap

    The number of air pockets that he determines on average per offensive snap.

  • % Team Air Yards

    The percentage of the team’s total air yards that it accounts for.

  • % Team goals

    The percentage of the team’s overall goals that it considers.

  • Average Depth of aim

    Also known as aDOT, this statistic measures the average downward distance that it is aiming at.

  • Catch rate

    The number of catches divided by the number of times he was attacked by the quarterback.

  • Rate of fall

    The number of passes he dropped divided by the number of times he was attacked by the quarterback.

  • Average After the catch

    The number of yards he will gain after catching his receptions.

% Yds after contact

101.9%

Average Depth of aim

2.4 Yds loading the extended NFL statistics …

2020 NFL game record

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2019 NFL Game Log

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2018 NFL score sheet

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2017 NFL Game Log

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2016 NFL score sheet

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Snap Distribution / Depth Chart See where Tevin Coleman positioned himself in the field and how he performed at each point. Loading Alignment Breakdown … Loading Alignment Breakdown … Loading Alignment Breakdown … Loading Team Alignment Breakdown … Loading NFL Split Statistics … Measurable Review
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How do Tevin Coleman’s readings compare to other running backs?

This section compares his draft training metrics with players in the same position. The bar represents the player’s percentile rank. For example, if the bar is halfway, the player will fall into the 50th percentile for that metric and this is considered average.

* The 40 yard dash metric is from his Pro Day. All others are from the NFL Combine.

Second verse, just like the first. Last year, coach Kyle Shanahan brought in Jerick McKinnon, a fast, athletic back who was comfortable in a timeshare. Shanahan did it again this off-season when he brought Coleman (a quick, athletic back who loves to work on a timeshare) off his old stomping lot in Atlanta. The former Falcon made his free-agent payday by hitting career highs at Rushing Yards and YPC in 2018, playing 16 games for the first time. His best feature is his rapid pace in open space, and Shanahan’s system is perfect for getting him the ball with lots of green in front of him. In his final season under his old / new coach, Coleman averaged a staggering 10.5 yards per goal, a number that ranked sixth in the league among all players (not just setbacks). While he could be a great weapon again with the Niners, how many touches Coleman gets is a tough question. McKinnon could be available sometime this season, and Matt Breida has shown over the past two years that he is well suited for the Shanahan offensive as well.

Coleman ran for a career high of 628 yards in 2017, but it’s difficult to rate his overall performance as progress. His 4.0 YPC was a career dip, and his reception numbers also fell slightly when new offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian failed to enable Coleman to use his explosive speed in the open field as often as Kyle Shanahan did. Heading into his fourth season in the NFL, Coleman has yet to fully demonstrate his ability to regain an advantage after having mixed results while Devonta Freeman was on sideline last season. Coleman’s wheels are undeniable, but he lacks the vision or vanity to make the most of his straight-line speed, and despite having a solid frame, he doesn’t run with a lot of strength or physicality, resulting in fewer broken tackles than top tackles. Create Tier Running Backs. He has made at least 15 career appearances last season, mostly avoiding the minor injuries seen in his first two NFL campaigns. With Freeman still having most of the Atlanta snapshots behind him, Coleman is unlikely to be planning a breakout season in the final year of his rookie contract unless his teammate misses a significant time.

The third vintage had a breakthrough in 2016, hitting a total of 11 touchdowns from just 149 touches when it emerged as one of the Falcons’ big play options during its Super Bowl run. Coleman’s groundbreaking open field speed is his most important asset as he still flashes the 4.44 meter time of 40 meters he recorded at Combine in 2015 and his off-season work to become a more complete back, also paid off with a strong increase in his role as a passport catcher. After catching just two passes as a rookie, Coleman took 31 out of 40 targets, stacking 13.6 yards per catch at that rate. Unfortunately, health problems again prevented him from playing a full schedule as hamstring strain cost the 24-year-old three games mid-season. Despite his 6-1, 210-pound frame, Coleman isn’t a particularly physical runner, and his abilities suit Devonta Freemans more than a complement, but that replication was used very effectively by offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan in 2016 when he kept the defense off guess which back would get which task for a given game. Whether or not the new coordinator, Steve Sarkisian, can keep this approach will be critical to whether Coleman can repeat or even improve on last year’s production.

When the camps opened last summer, Coleman was seen as the front runner in the Atlanta backcourt, with Devonta Freeman being the secondary option. Coleman was the starter on opening night but a rib injury set him back and Freeman took the job and ran with it. Coleman was not helping his own cause with the occasional problem. This does not mean that things cannot tip over in 2016. Coleman averaged a solid 4.5 per carry as a rookie, and Freeman’s play declined significantly in the second half of the year. We know any start to a Kyle Shahahan offensive can be a bunch of fun, which at least means Coleman is one of the best backups in the league. Keep an eye on him.

While Todd Gurley and Melvin Gordon are no rags in the first round, Coleman could be the most exciting back chosen in this year’s draft, as he can turn any touch into a touchdown. In fact, half of his 28 career rushing TDs in Indiana came on runs of 40 yards or more. While not an ideal size for a feature at 5-11, 206, Coleman is incredibly explosive, hitting holes and making level two before the defense knows what hit it and his 4.39 time in the 40 yard -The Dash area is not just a Track Mirage. He’s also flashing very hard, slipping and changing direction without slowing down, and when he’s finally run out of space he’s no longer afraid to lower his pads and fight for extra yards. His reception skills are solid as well, but Coleman’s ability to overtake everyone in college has masked some shortcomings and his vision and patience will require some work to take full advantage of his gifts in the NFL. Second year Devonta Freeman, a similarly slippery but undersized runner, has the incumbent advantage in a training camp battle for the top spot in the backfield, and Holdover Antone Smith will see some touch too, but Coleman’s groundbreaking speed should make it tough, to keep him out of the field.

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